The Story Behind This Haunted Hotel in Missouri is Terrifying

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Written By Blue & Gold NLR Team

 

 

 

 

Missouri is a state with a rich history and culture, but also a dark and mysterious side. Among the many attractions and landmarks that draw visitors to the Show-Me State, there are some that are known for their paranormal activity and ghostly encounters. One of these is the Lemp Mansion Inn, a haunted hotel in St. Louis that has a tragic and terrifying story behind it.

The Lemp Family Legacy

The Lemp Mansion Inn was once the home of the Lemp family, who were the founders of the Lemp Brewing Company, one of the most successful beer businesses in the country in the late 1800s and early 1900s. The mansion, built in 1868, was a lavish and elegant residence that reflected the wealth and status of the Lemps. The family also owned a network of caves under the mansion, where they stored and brewed their beer.

However, the Lemp family was also plagued by misfortune and tragedy. In 1901, the eldest son and heir to the brewing empire, Frederick Lemp, died of heart failure at the age of 28. His father, William Lemp Sr., was devastated by the loss and became depressed and withdrawn. In 1904, he shot himself in the head in his bedroom at the mansion.

The Lemp Brewing Company was then inherited by William Lemp Jr., who tried to keep the business afloat amid the competition and the prohibition era. He also had a troubled marriage and a secret affair with a woman named Lillian Handlan, who bore him a son. The son, who was born with Down syndrome, was hidden from the public and kept in the attic of the mansion. He was known as the “Lemp Monkey Face Boy” and died at the age of 30.

In 1920, William Lemp Jr.’s sister, Elsa Lemp Wright, who was also unhappy in her marriage, shot herself in the heart at her home. In 1922, William Lemp Jr. followed his father’s footsteps and killed himself in the same bedroom at the mansion. In 1943, his brother, Charles Lemp, who lived alone at the mansion with his dog and a servant, also shot himself in the head in his room. He also shot his dog before killing himself.

The Lemp Brewing Company was sold at a fraction of its value and the mansion was turned into a boarding house. The mansion was then bought by Dick Pointer in 1975, who restored it and opened it as a restaurant and inn. Since then, the Lemp Mansion Inn has been the site of numerous reports of paranormal activity and ghost sightings.

The Haunted Hotel in Missouri

The Lemp Mansion Inn is considered one of the most haunted hotels in Missouri, and even in the country. Guests and staff have experienced various phenomena, such as cold spots, strange noises, apparitions, voices, footsteps, doors opening and closing, objects moving or disappearing, and feelings of being watched or touched.

Some of the most haunted rooms in the hotel are the ones where the Lemps committed suicide, such as the William Lemp Suite, the Charles Lemp Suite, and the Lavender Suite. The attic, where the Lemp Monkey Face Boy lived and died, is also a hotspot for paranormal activity. Many people have claimed to see or hear the boy, who is said to be playful and curious.

The Lemp Mansion Inn also offers ghost tours, paranormal investigations, and murder mystery dinners for those who want to learn more about the history and the hauntings of the hotel. The hotel is also a popular venue for weddings, parties, and other events, as well as a restaurant that serves traditional German cuisine and Lemp beer.

Conclusion

The Lemp Mansion Inn is a haunted hotel in Missouri that has a terrifying story behind it. The hotel was once the home of the Lemp family, who were the owners of a successful brewing company, but also the victims of a series of tragedies and suicides. The hotel is now a place where guests and staff encounter the ghosts of the Lemps and other unexplained phenomena. The Lemp Mansion Inn is a place that attracts both history buffs and thrill seekers, who want to experience the mystery and the horror of this haunted hotel in Missouri.

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