7 Kentucky Towns People Are Fleeing As Soon As Possible

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Written By Blue & Gold NLR Team

 

 

 

 

Kentucky, also known as the Bluegrass State, is famous for its horse racing, bourbon, fried chicken, and bluegrass music. However, not all of its towns are equally attractive to live in. Some of them are experiencing population decline, economic hardship, crime, and other problems that make people want to leave as soon as possible. Here are seven of them, based on the latest census data and other sources.

1. Jenkins

Jenkins is a small town in Letcher County, in the eastern part of the state. It was once a thriving coal mining community, but the decline of the industry has left it with high unemployment, poverty, and drug addiction. The population of Jenkins has dropped by 28.5% since 2010, from 2,203 to 1,575 in 2020. The median household income is only $21,250, and the poverty rate is 41.9%. The town also suffers from environmental issues, such as water contamination and air pollution.

2. Clay City

Clay City is located in Powell County, in the central region of Kentucky. It is known for its proximity to the Red River Gorge, a popular destination for hiking, camping, and rock climbing. However, the town itself has little to offer to its residents, who are leaving in large numbers. The population of Clay City has decreased by 25.4% since 2010, from 1,077 to 803 in 2020. The median household income is $25,833, and the poverty rate is 35.6%. The town also has a high crime rate, with 1,029 violent and property crimes per 100,000 people.

3. Fulton

Fulton is a town in Fulton County, in the southwestern corner of the state. It is part of the Kentucky Bend, a geographic anomaly that makes it surrounded by the Mississippi River on three sides. The town was once a major railroad hub and a center of commerce, but it has lost its economic vitality over the years. The population of Fulton has declined by 23.8% since 2010, from 2,445 to 1,863 in 2020. The median household income is $26,250, and the poverty rate is 32.4%. The town also has a low educational attainment, with only 69.9% of adults having a high school diploma or higher.

4. Lynch

Lynch is another coal mining town in Letcher County, in the eastern part of the state. It was founded by the U.S. Coal and Coke Company in 1917, and was once the largest coal camp in the world, with over 10,000 residents. However, the town has been in decline since the 1950s, as the coal industry dwindled and the company pulled out. The population of Lynch has fallen by 22.9% since 2010, from 747 to 576 in 2020. The median household income is $19,375, and the poverty rate is 47.4%. The town also faces health problems, such as obesity, diabetes, and cancer.

5. Barbourville

Barbourville is the county seat of Knox County, in the southeastern part of the state. It is the home of Union College, a private liberal arts institution. However, the town is not benefiting from the presence of the college, as it is losing its population and economy. The population of Barbourville has shrunk by 21.8% since 2010, from 3,159 to 2,470 in 2020. The median household income is $18,750, and the poverty rate is 49.9%. The town also has a high crime rate, with 1,456 violent and property crimes per 100,000 people.

6. West Liberty

West Liberty is the county seat of Morgan County, in the eastern part of the state. It is situated in the Daniel Boone National Forest, and is known for its scenic beauty and outdoor recreation. However, the town has not recovered from the devastating tornado that struck it in 2012, killing six people and destroying much of its infrastructure. The population of West Liberty has decreased by 21.6% since 2010, from 3,435 to 2,693 in 2020. The median household income is $24,583, and the poverty rate is 34.8%. The town also has a low educational attainment, with only 70.8% of adults having a high school diploma or higher.

7. Marion

Marion is the county seat of Crittenden County, in the western part of the state. It is located near the Ohio River, and is a gateway to the Shawnee National Forest. However, the town is suffering from population loss, economic stagnation, and social problems. The population of Marion has dropped by 20.9% since 2010, from 3,039 to 2,402 in 2020. The median household income is $29,375, and the poverty rate is 28.7%. The town also has a high crime rate, with 1,237 violent and property crimes per 100,000 people.

Conclusion

These are some of the towns in Kentucky that people are fleeing as soon as possible, due to various reasons such as population decline, economic hardship, crime, and environmental issues. While some of these towns may have some historical or cultural significance, they are not appealing to live in for most people. Therefore, they are likely to continue to lose their residents and face more challenges in the future.

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