5 North Carolina Towns People Are Fleeing as Soon as Possible

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Written By Blue & Gold NLR Team

 

 

 

 

North Carolina boasts various attractions, including stunning beaches, mountains, and cities. Nevertheless, not all towns in the state are considered desirable places to reside due to economic decline, elevated crime rates, diminished quality of life, and population loss. Here are five North Carolina towns experiencing a notable exodus.

Lumberton

Located in Robeson County near the South Carolina border, Lumberton, with a population of around 20,000, has witnessed a decline of more than 9% since 2000. The town struggles with a low median household income of $28,293, a high poverty rate of 35.5%, and elevated crime rates – 14.8 violent crimes and 69.7 property crimes per 1,000 residents. Additionally, Lumberton faced severe flooding and damage from Hurricane Florence in 2018.

Laurinburg

Situated in Scotland County in the southern part of the state, Laurinburg, with a population of approximately 15,000, has lost over 8% of its residents since 2000. The town grapples with a low median household income of $29,506, a high poverty rate of 32.4%, and elevated crime rates – 13.7 violent crimes and 76.9 property crimes per 1,000 residents. Laurinburg, once a textile and manufacturing town, has experienced economic hardship and job losses due to outsourcing and automation.

Roanoke Rapids

Found in Halifax County in the northeastern part of the state, Roanoke Rapids, with a population of about 15,000, has seen a decrease of more than 7% since 2000. The town faces challenges such as a low median household income of $34,424, a high poverty rate of 24.9%, and elevated crime rates – 10.4 violent crimes and 67.4 property crimes per 1,000 residents. Similar to other towns, Roanoke Rapids, a former textile and manufacturing center, has struggled with economic decline and unemployment.

Eden

Eden, located in Rockingham County in the northern part of the state, with a population of around 15,000, has lost over 13% of its residents since 2000. The town grapples with a low median household income of $32,909, a high poverty rate of 22.6%, and elevated crime rates – 10.8 violent crimes and 64.8 property crimes per 1,000 residents. Eden, once a thriving textile and manufacturing town, has faced economic hardship and job losses due to outsourcing and environmental issues.

Kinston

Positioned in Lenoir County in the eastern part of the state, Kinston, with a population of about 20,000, has lost over 16% of its residents since 2000. The town contends with a low median household income of $30,369, a high poverty rate of 35.8%, and elevated crime rates – 12.9 violent crimes and 66.2 property crimes per 1,000 residents. Kinston, another former textile and manufacturing town, has also suffered from natural disasters like hurricanes and floods, adversely affecting the town’s infrastructure and economy.

These are some of the North Carolina towns witnessing a departure of residents in search of better opportunities and quality of life. While the state has numerous attractive and flourishing places to live, these towns are not currently among them. Hopefully, these communities can find ways to rejuvenate themselves and attract new residents in the future.

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